Tropic of Capricorn by Simon Reeve

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In Tropic of Capricorn, bestselling author Simon Reeve embarks on a 23,000-mile trek around the southernmost border of the tropics – a place of both amazing beauty and overwhelming human suffering. Heading east through Africa, Australia and South America, Simon encounters breathtaking landscapes and truly extraordinary people: from Bushmen of the Kalahari and Namibian prostitutes battling with HIV to gem miners in Madagascar and teenagers in the Brazilian favela once described as the most dangerous place on earth. It is a collection of daring adventures, strange rituals and exotic wildlife, all linked together by one invisible line.
Like the best travel writing, Tropic of Capricorn confronts important issues of our time – our changing environment, poverty, globalisation – by taking us on an unforgettable journey of discovery.

Tropic of Capricorn

Around the World on a Motorcycle: 1928 to 1936 by Zoltan Sulkowsky

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The year was 1928 when two young Hungarians decided to travel around the world on a motorcycle. Like Robert Fulton, whose circumnavigation of the globe is chronicled in his 1937 book “One Man Caravan”, Sulkowsky thought his was the first around-the-world journey on a motorcycle. Sulkowsky’s account of his travels, originally published in Hungary in 1937, has recently been translated into English and published with the original photographs. The trip, on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle with sidecar, started in Paris, France. During the next eight years Sulkowsky and his friend Gyula Bartha travelled through Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, Australia, south-east Asia, China, Japan, North and South America, and back to Europe. They earned enough money to keep travelling by selling photographs and accounts of their experiences and giving lectures in the many cities they visited along the way.Sulkowsky gives a very clear-eyed view of the world in the 1930s – a world where the colonising influence of Europe had affected much of Africa and Asia. He describes in detail the overwhelming effect the British had on Indian culture and contrasts that with countries farther east where the trappings of European dominance barely reached beyond the major cities. Sulkowsky and Bartha experienced the riches of sultans, witnessed primitive cultures and extreme poverty in remote villages, travelled through wilderness with the ever-present danger of wild animals, and traversed roads of all descriptions. They dealt with mud, sand, extreme heat and cold, and rivers where the motorcycle had to be taken apart to cross in a small boat. This intelligent and engaging book offers a unique worldview between the World Wars, flavoured by a sampling of the great diversity of cultures and the wide variety of human life that exists on this planet.

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23 Sweet FAs: Round the World with a Football Table by Andy Sloan

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23 Sweet FAs records Andy’s adventure through Europe, Russia, Iran, India, the Himalayas and the Far East. He encountered a warm welcome from the president of FIFA, witnessed the titanic clash of Iran v Iraq, took tea in the home of the Dalai Lama, survived tragedy on Mount Everest and celebrated triumph in Japan. Bursting with enthusiasm, football histories and fascinating trivia, 23 Sweet FAs proves that cultural difference is no barrier when it comes to the beautiful game.

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Take Me with You: A round the world journey to invite a stranger home by Brad Newsham

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‘Someday, when I am rich, I am going to invite someone from my travels to visit me in America.’
Brad Newsham was a twenty-two-year-old travelling through Afghanistan when he wrote this in his journal. Fourteen years later, he’s a Yellow Taxi driver working in San Francisco. He’s not rich, but he has never forgotten his vow.
Take Me With You is the compelling account of his journey through the Philippines, India, Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and South Africa as he searches for the right person – someone who couldn’t afford to leave their own country, let alone holiday in the West. Newsham’s story will change the way you think about your life and the lives of those you meet when you travel.

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A World of My Own: The First Ever Non-stop Solo Round the World Voyage by Robin Knox-Johnston

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On Friday 14 June 1968 Suhaili, a tiny ketch, slipped almost unnoticed out of Falmouth harbour steered by the solitary figure at her helm, Robin Knox-Johnston. Ten and a half months later Suhaili, paintwork peeling and rust streaked, her once white sails weathered and brown, her self-steering gone, her tiller arm jury rigged to the rudder head, came romping joyously back to Falmouth to a fantastic reception for Robin, who had become the first man to sail round the world non-stop single-handed. By every standard it was an incredible adventure, perhaps the last great uncomputerised journey left to man. Every hazard, every temptation to abandon the astounding voyage came Robin’s way, from polluted water tanks, smashed cabin top and collapsed boom to lost self-steering gear and sheered off tiller, and all before the tiny ketch had fought her way to Cape Horn, the point of no return, the fearsome test of any seaman’s nerve and determination. A World of My Own is Robin’s gripping, uninhibited, moving account of one of the greatest sea adventures of our time. An instant bestseller, it is now reissued for a new generation of readers to be enthralled and inspired.

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The Lunatic Express: Discovering The World Via Its Most Dangerous Buses, Boats, Trains And Planes by Carl Hoffman

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Indonesian Ferry Sinks. Peruvian Bus Plunges Off Cliff. African Train Attacked by Mobs. Whenever he picked up the newspaper, Carl Hoffman noticed those short news bulletins, which seemed about as far from the idea of tourism, travel as the pursuit of pleasure, as it was possible to get. So off he went, spending six months circumnavigating the globe on the world’s worst conveyances: the statistically most dangerous airlines, the most crowded and dangerous ferries, the slowest buses, and the most rickety trains. The Lunatic Express takes us into the heart of the world, to some its most teeming cities and remotest places: from Havana to Bogotá on the perilous Cuban Airways. Lima to the Amazon on crowded night buses where the road is a washed-out track. Across Indonesia and Bangladesh by overcrowded ferries that kill 1,000 passengers a year. On commuter trains in Mumbai so crowded that dozens perish daily, across Afghanistan as the Taliban closes in, and, scariest of all, Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., by Greyhound.
The Lunatic Express is the story of traveling with seatmates and deckmates who have left home without American Express cards on conveyances that don’t take Visa, and seldom take you anywhere you’d want to go. But it’s also the story of traveling as it used to be — a sometimes harrowing trial, of finding adventure in a modern, rapidly urbanizing world and the generosity of poor strangers, from ear cleaners to urban bus drivers to itinerant roughnecks, who make up most of the world’s population. More than just an adventure story, The Lunatic Express is a funny, harrowing and insightful look at the world as it is, a planet full of hundreds of millions of people, mostly poor, on the move and seeking their fortunes.
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