The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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When young American Chad Thomson sets out on the adventure of a lifetime, little does he know how much of an impact the world will have on him. In this first installment of his travel memoirs, Chad begins his round-the-world travel adventure in typical American style. During his four weeks in India he discovers:
Nepal is not in India
The origin of the word tiffin (a mix of the words tin and muffin)
McDonald’s in India is not like the McDonald’s in the USA
And much more!
Follow Chad as he follows exactly what the Bible tells him (not the Holy Bible, the travelers Bible) and immerses himself in the local culture, meeting people from Australia, the USA and even one or two from India!

About Chad:
Chad Thomson is just a typical American leaving the comforts of his home country to explore the world. He was inspired to write about his adventures after reading the many, many travel blogs online. He writes travel stories and articles at http://www.backpackingwithchad.com

This is his story.*

*not the whole story, just the part that takes place in India. Stay tuned for further installments of The Adventures Of A Typical American!

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The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson


The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

The New Great Game: Blood and Oil in Central Asia by Lutz Kleveman

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The Caspian Region, lying south of Russia, west of China and north of Afghanistan, contains the world’s largest untapped oil and gas resources. In the years between the death of the Soviet Union and September 11, 2001, oil companies and politicians have struggled to possess and develop these resources. Using a concept immortalised by Kipling in his novel Kim, Lutz Kleveman argues that there is now a new ‘Great Game’ in the region, in which the US, Russia, China, India, Pakistan and Iran – most of which are nuclear powers – are competing.. Kleveman has produced an insightful and exacting portrait of a new theatre of war, a region in which there are few rules and in which the rewards for victory are nothing less than power and prosperity in the new century.

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23 Sweet FAs: Round the World with a Football Table by Andy Sloan

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23 Sweet FAs records Andy’s adventure through Europe, Russia, Iran, India, the Himalayas and the Far East. He encountered a warm welcome from the president of FIFA, witnessed the titanic clash of Iran v Iraq, took tea in the home of the Dalai Lama, survived tragedy on Mount Everest and celebrated triumph in Japan. Bursting with enthusiasm, football histories and fascinating trivia, 23 Sweet FAs proves that cultural difference is no barrier when it comes to the beautiful game.

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Take Me with You: A round the world journey to invite a stranger home by Brad Newsham

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‘Someday, when I am rich, I am going to invite someone from my travels to visit me in America.’
Brad Newsham was a twenty-two-year-old travelling through Afghanistan when he wrote this in his journal. Fourteen years later, he’s a Yellow Taxi driver working in San Francisco. He’s not rich, but he has never forgotten his vow.
Take Me With You is the compelling account of his journey through the Philippines, India, Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe and South Africa as he searches for the right person – someone who couldn’t afford to leave their own country, let alone holiday in the West. Newsham’s story will change the way you think about your life and the lives of those you meet when you travel.

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City Of Djinns: A Year In Delhi by William Dalrymple

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Certainly, said the Sufi mystic, he could show William Dalrymple a djinn: but he would run away. With his wife Olivia, William stayed for a year in Delhi. Lodging with the beady-eyed Mrs Puri and her eccentric husband, rushing around in the International Backside taxi of Balvinder Singh, the sights and sensations of the city and the Delhi-wallahs closed in around him. Through the narrow alleys of the Old City, along the broad boulevard of the New City of the Raj, he pursued the spirit of the people and their living history through the burning heat and bitter cold of Delhi weather, finally to discover, in the crashing rains of the monsoon, his own and eternal City of Djinns.
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City Of Joy by Dominique Lapierre

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Exactly halfway through Lapierre’s The City of Joy, a missionary priest exclaims, “Bless you, Calcutta, for in your wretchedness you have given birth to saints.” It is about several such saints struggling against overwhelming wretchedness that this account of life in the most squalid of Calcutta’s slums, Anand Nagar (“The City of Joy”), concerns itself. In the telling, the protagonists find themselves overwhelmed in turn by a love and compassion as transforming and inexplicable as grace. The tale is initially absorbing, constantly disturbing and ultimately uplifting. Anand Nagar, according to Lapierre (who spent three years in Calcutta and Bengal researching the book), has the densest concentration of humans anywhere on earth. More than 70,000 Muslims, Hindus, Christians, Sikhs, Parsis and Buddhists are crammed into an area smaller than two football fields. Their average income is less than 10 cents a day. With one latrine for every 2,500 people and one fountain for every 3,000, sanitation is, to all intents and purposes, nonexistent. And yet, despite the crowding, the poverty, the scorpions, mosquitoes, rats and ordure, “The City of Joy” glows with human feeling. Orphaned children are immediately adopted by neighbors; religious festivals joyously praise a variety of gods; lepers are embraced and cared for; eunuchs (damned in Hindu theology) are revered. Lapierre traces the progress of a handful of idealists through this Indian Inferno-Purgatorio-Paradiso: the rickshaw-puller Hasari Pal; a Polish Catholic priest, Stephan Kovalski; Max Loeb, a young American doctor; Bandona, a beautiful Assamese nurse. Even Mother Teresa makes an appearance at the periphery of the narrative. Their alternating and, eventually, intertwining stories create a tapestry of human suffering, sacrifice and courage.
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Are You Experienced? by William Sutcliffe

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A devastatingly funny satire on the whole idea of student travel,and particularly the India back-pack trail. Dave travels to India with Liz because he thinks he might be able to get her into bed. Liz travels to India with Dave because she wants a companion for her voyage of spiritual discovery. She loves it. He dreams of frosty mornings, pints of lager and restaurants where vegetable curry is only a side-dish…
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