The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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When young American Chad Thomson sets out on the adventure of a lifetime, little does he know how much of an impact the world will have on him. In this first installment of his travel memoirs, Chad begins his round-the-world travel adventure in typical American style. During his four weeks in India he discovers:
Nepal is not in India
The origin of the word tiffin (a mix of the words tin and muffin)
McDonald’s in India is not like the McDonald’s in the USA
And much more!
Follow Chad as he follows exactly what the Bible tells him (not the Holy Bible, the travelers Bible) and immerses himself in the local culture, meeting people from Australia, the USA and even one or two from India!

About Chad:
Chad Thomson is just a typical American leaving the comforts of his home country to explore the world. He was inspired to write about his adventures after reading the many, many travel blogs online. He writes travel stories and articles at http://www.backpackingwithchad.com

This is his story.*

*not the whole story, just the part that takes place in India. Stay tuned for further installments of The Adventures Of A Typical American!

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The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson


The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam with Ibn Battutah by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

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For Ibn Batuttah of Tangier, being medieval didn’t mean sitting at home waiting for renaissances, enlightenments and easyJet. It meant travelling the known world to its limits.
Seven centuries on, Tim Mackintosh-Smith’s passionate pursuit of the fourteenth-century traveller takes him to landfalls in remote tropical islands, torrid Indian Ocean ports and dusty towns on the shores of the Saharan sand-sea. His zigzag itinerary across time and space leads from Zanzibar to the Alhambra (via the Maldives, Sri Lanka, China, Mauritania and Guinea) and to a climactic conclusion to his quest for the man he calls ‘IB’ – a man who out-travelled Marco Polo by a factor of three, who spent his days with saints and sultans and his nights with an intercontinental string of slave-concubines.
Tim’s journey is a search for survivals from IB’s world – material, human, spiritual, edible – however, when your fellow traveller has a 700-year head start, familiar notions don’t always work.

Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam with Ibn Battutah

Brazilian Adventure: A Quest into the Heart of the Amazon by Peter Fleming

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In the summer of 1925 Colonel Fawcett – soldier, spy and legendary explorer – embarked on a journey into the dark and uncharted heart of Brazil in search of the lost ‘City of Z’. He was never seen again. Rumours abounded – that Fawcett had been killed by Indians or wild animals or that he had lost his memory and become chief of a cannibal tribe – and many became obsessed with discovering what had become of him. In 1932, when ‘The Times’ advertised for ‘guns’ to join an expedition to find Fawcett, the lure was too great for a young Peter Fleming and he immediately signed up, intending to send dazzling dispatches from the jungle. The expedition set out from Sao Paulo and, following tributaries of the Amazon, headed to Fawcett’s last-known position. What followed was, in Fleming’s words, ‘a venture for which Rider Haggard might have written the plot and Conrad designed the scenery’. As the expedition forged its way deeper into the Amazon, disagreements fractured the group and the entire adventure ended in a chaotic race to be the first to report back home. Though the fate of Colonel Fawcett remains a mystery, Peter Fleming’s wild escapade in the heart of Brazil has become one of the 20th century’s best-loved travel classics.

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All Elevations Unknown: An Adventure In The Heart Of Borneo by Sam Lightner

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In the spring of 1999, armed with little more than a description from a book and a map labeled “all elevations unknown,” Sam Lightner and his German rock-climbing buddy, Volker, found themselves deep in the jungles of Borneo on a mission to climb a mountain that was only rumored to exist. What little they knew about the mountain they had learned from the memoirs of Major Tom Harrisson, a British World War II soldier who in 1945 had been assigned the near-impossible mission of parachuting blindly into the thick Borneo rainforest–where the natives had a grisly habit of cutting off heads–to try to reclaim the island for the Allies.
A captivating, utterly original combination of travel adventure memoir and historical re-creation, All Elevations Unknown charts Lightner’s exhilarating and at times harrowing quest to ascend the mountain Batu Lawi in the face of leeches, vipers, and sweat bees, and to keep his team together in one of the earth’s most treacherous uncharted pockets. Along the way, he reconstructs a fascinating historical narrative that chronicles Tom Harrisson’s adventures there during the war and illuminates an astonishing piece of forgotten World War II history. Rife with suspense and vivid detail, the two intertwining tales open up the island of Borneo, its people, and its history in a powerful, unforgettable way, taking adventure writing to new heights.

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Crossing the Heart of Africa: An Odyssey of Love and Adventure by Julian Smith

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“The amazing true story of Julian Smith, who retraced the journey of legendary British explorer Ewart The Leopard Grogan, the first man to cross the length of Africa, in hopes of also winning the heart of the woman he loved. In 1898, the dashing young British explorer Ewart the Leopard Grogan was in love. In order to prove his mettle to his beloved – and her aristocratic stepfather – he set out on a quest to become the first person to walk across Africa, a feat hitherto thought by many explorers to be impossible”. (“New York Times”, 1900). In 2007, thirty-five-year-old American journalist Julian Smith faced a similar problem with his girlfriend of six years …and decided to address it in the same way Grogan had more than a hundred years before: he was going to retrace the Leopard’s 4,500-mile journey for love and glory through the lakes, volcanoes, savannas, and crowded modern cities of Africa. Smith interweaves both adventures into a seamless narrative in “Crossing the Heart of Africa”: the story of two explorers, a century apart, who both traversed the length of Africa to prove themselves …and came back changed men.

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The Lost City of Z: A Legendary British Explorer’s Deadly Quest To Uncover The Secrets Of The Amazon by David Grann

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Colonel Percy Harrison Fawcett, the inspiration behind Conan Doyle’s novel The Lost World, was among the last of a legendary breed of British explorers. For years he explored the Amazon and came to believe that its jungle concealed a large, complex civilization, like El Dorado. Obsessed with its discovery, he christened it the City of Z. In 1925, Fawcett headed into the wilderness with his son Jack, vowing to make history. They vanished without a trace. For the next eighty years, hordes of explorers plunged into the jungle, trying to find evidence of Fawcett’s party or Z. Some died from disease and starvation; others simply disappeared. In this spellbinding true tale of lethal obsession, David Grann retraces the footsteps of Fawcett and his followers as he unravels one of the greatest mysteries of exploration.
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Blood River: A Journey To Africa’s Broken Heart by Tim Butcher

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When “Daily Telegraph” correspondent Tim Butcher was sent to cover Africa in 2000 he quickly became obsessed with the idea of recreating H. M. Stanley’s famous expedition – but travelling alone. Despite warnings that his plan was ‘suicidal’, Butcher set out for the Congo’s eastern border with just a rucksack and a few thousand dollars hidden in his boots. Making his way in an assortment of vessels including a motorbike and a dugout canoe, helped along by a cast of characters from UN aid workers to a campaigning pygmy, he followed in the footsteps of the great Victorian adventurers. Butcher’s journey was a remarkable feat, but the story of the Congo, told expertly and vividly in this book, is more remarkable still.
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