The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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When young American Chad Thomson sets out on the adventure of a lifetime, little does he know how much of an impact the world will have on him. In this first installment of his travel memoirs, Chad begins his round-the-world travel adventure in typical American style. During his four weeks in India he discovers:
Nepal is not in India
The origin of the word tiffin (a mix of the words tin and muffin)
McDonald’s in India is not like the McDonald’s in the USA
And much more!
Follow Chad as he follows exactly what the Bible tells him (not the Holy Bible, the travelers Bible) and immerses himself in the local culture, meeting people from Australia, the USA and even one or two from India!

About Chad:
Chad Thomson is just a typical American leaving the comforts of his home country to explore the world. He was inspired to write about his adventures after reading the many, many travel blogs online. He writes travel stories and articles at http://www.backpackingwithchad.com

This is his story.*

*not the whole story, just the part that takes place in India. Stay tuned for further installments of The Adventures Of A Typical American!

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The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson


The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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Hokkaido Highway Blues: Hitchhiking Japan by Will Ferguson

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It had never been done before. Not in 2,000 years of Japanese recorded history had anyone followed the Cherry Blossom Front from one end of the country to the other. Nor had anyone hitchhiked the length of Japan. But, heady on sakura and sake, Will Ferguson bet he could do both. The resulting travelogue is one of the funniest and most illuminating books ever written about Japan. And, as Ferguson learns, it illustrates that to travel is better than to arrive.

Hokkaido Highway Blues: Hitchhiking Japan

Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West by Paul Howard

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As bicycle races go, the attractions of the Tour Divide are not immediately apparent. For a start, it is the longest mountain-bike race in the world, running nearly 3,000 miles down the Rockies from Canada to Mexico. But the distance is not the only challenge – the total ascent of 200,000 ft is the equivalent of scaling Mount Everest nearly seven times.
Then there are the dangerous animals likely to be encountered on the route: grizzly bears, mountain lions and wolves, not to mention rattlesnakes and tarantulas. Worse, the rewards for all this effort are strictly limited. Unlike in the Tour de France, there is no fabled yellow jersey and no prize money.
Yet, undaunted, and in spite of never having owned a mountain bike, Paul Howard signed up. Battling the worst weather for generations, drinking whiskey with a cowboy and singing karaoke with the locals, Howard’s journey turned into more than just a race – it became the adventure of a lifetime.

Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West

Brazilian Adventure: A Quest into the Heart of the Amazon by Peter Fleming

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In the summer of 1925 Colonel Fawcett – soldier, spy and legendary explorer – embarked on a journey into the dark and uncharted heart of Brazil in search of the lost ‘City of Z’. He was never seen again. Rumours abounded – that Fawcett had been killed by Indians or wild animals or that he had lost his memory and become chief of a cannibal tribe – and many became obsessed with discovering what had become of him. In 1932, when ‘The Times’ advertised for ‘guns’ to join an expedition to find Fawcett, the lure was too great for a young Peter Fleming and he immediately signed up, intending to send dazzling dispatches from the jungle. The expedition set out from Sao Paulo and, following tributaries of the Amazon, headed to Fawcett’s last-known position. What followed was, in Fleming’s words, ‘a venture for which Rider Haggard might have written the plot and Conrad designed the scenery’. As the expedition forged its way deeper into the Amazon, disagreements fractured the group and the entire adventure ended in a chaotic race to be the first to report back home. Though the fate of Colonel Fawcett remains a mystery, Peter Fleming’s wild escapade in the heart of Brazil has become one of the 20th century’s best-loved travel classics.

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River Of Time by Jon Swain

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Jon Swain left Britain as a teenager. After a brief stint with the French Foreign Legion he became a journalist in Paris, but soon ended up in Vietnam and Cambodia. In five years as a young war reporter Swain lived moments of intensity and passion such as he had never known. He learnt something of life and death in Cambodia and Vietnam that he could never have perceived in Europe. He saw Indo-China in all its intoxicating beauty and saw, too, the violence and corruption of war, and was sickened by it.
Motivated by a sense of close involvement with the Cambodian people he went back into Phnom Penh just before the fall of the city to the Khmer Rouge in April 1975. He was captured and was going to be executed. His life was saved by Dith Pran, the New York Times interpreter, a story told by the film The Killing Fields. In Indo-China Swain formed a passionate love affair with a French-Vietnamese girl. The demands of a war correspondent ran roughshod over his personal life and the relationship ended.
This book is one reporter’s attempt to make peace with a tumultuous past, to come to terms with his memories of fear, pain, and death, and to say adieu to the Indo-China he loved and the way of life that has gone for ever.

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French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France by Tim Moore

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Seduced by the speed and glamour of the biggest annual sporting event in the world, and determined to tackle the most fearsome physical challenge outside classical mythology, Moore, the ultimate amateur, attempts to complete all 3,630km of the 2000 Tour in the weeks before the professionals set off.
Battling it out with the old men on butchers’ bikes across the plains of Aquitaine and pursued by cattle over Europe’s second highest road, Moore soon finds himself resorting to narcotic assistance, systematic overeating and waxed legs before summoning a support vehicle staffed by cruelly sceptical family and friends. Accounts of his suffering and chicanery, and those encountered in the race’s epic history, are interwoven through a look at rural France busy tarting itself up for those 15 seconds of fame as the Tour careers through at 50kph. An heroic depiction of an inadequate man’s attempt to achieve the unachievable, Moore’s Tour is a tale of calorific excess, ludicrous clothing and intimate discomfort.

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Crazy River by Richard Grant

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No-one travels like the renowned writer-adventurer Richard Grant and, really, no-one should. Having narrowly escaped death at the hands of Mexican drug barons in Bandit Roads, he now plunges with his trademark recklessness and curiosity into Africa. Setting out to make the first descent of a previously unexplored river in Tanzania, he gets waylaid by thieves, whores and a degenerate former golf pro in Zanzibar, then crosses the Indian Ocean in a cargo dhow before the real adventure begins on the Malagarasi river. Travelling by raft, dodging bullets, hippos, lions and crocodiles, hacking through swamps and succumbing to fevers, Grant’s gripping, illuminating and often hilarious book will thrill his devoted readers and bring him to an even broader audience.

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