Solomon Time: Adventures In The South Pacific by Will Randall

Leave a comment

Echoing the experiences of Robert Louis Stevenson – who spent several years in the South Pacific – here is the story of a contemporary writer who lived in and came to love the Solomon Islands. Most unexpectedly, Will Randall, once a happy schoolteacher, found himself dispatched to a small village on a not very large island, far out in the vastness of the South Pacific. His mission (although he had hardly chosen to accept it): – to fulfil the dying wishes of the ‘Commander’ and help the local people set up a money-making community project. The Solomon Islands, islands lost in time – Solomon Time; these little gems of land scattered across the ocean, must be the last sanctuary on our shrivelled planet not yet overshadowed by the Golden Arches or encapsulated in a Coca-Cola bubble. Everyone has dreamed at some time of living on a desert island. Here is the unvarnished truth. Sharks, turtles, a band of unruly chickens, a cast of extraordinary characters, and a bird called the Spangled Drongo, accompany Will Randall through some of the most fascinating and certainly funniest scenes to be found in travel writing since Gerald Durrell.

Where The Hell Is Tuvalu?: How I Became The Law Man Of The World’s Fourth Smallest Country by Philip Ells

Leave a comment

Everyone dreams of ditching the rat-race, jumping off the treadmill, turning their life on its head and doing something worthwhile, but Philip Ells turned that fantasy into a reality. Imagining turquoise seas, sandy beaches and lush tropical trees, Ells flies off to the Pacific island state of Tuvalu armed only with his Voluntary Service Overseas briefing and his hopes of finding paradise. Nothing, however, could quite prepare him for the reality of life on Tuvalu. In this hilarious, dramatic and insightful book, Philip Ells describes with self-deprecating wit the collision between himself and the Pacific Islanders’ sometimes extraordinary behaviour.

The Sex Lives Of Cannibals: Adrift In The Equatorial Pacific by J. Maarten Troost

Leave a comment

At the age of twenty-six, Maarten Troost—who had been pushing the snooze button on the alarm clock of life by racking up useless graduate degrees and muddling through a series of temp jobs—decided to pack up his flip-flops and move to Tarawa, a remote South Pacific island in the Republic of Kiribati. He was restless and lacked direction, and the idea of dropping everything and moving to the ends of the earth was irresistibly romantic. He should have known better.
Click on the image for more information and to read reviews for this book.

Add your own review or rating in the comments section!

%d bloggers like this: