The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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When young American Chad Thomson sets out on the adventure of a lifetime, little does he know how much of an impact the world will have on him. In this first installment of his travel memoirs, Chad begins his round-the-world travel adventure in typical American style. During his four weeks in India he discovers:
Nepal is not in India
The origin of the word tiffin (a mix of the words tin and muffin)
McDonald’s in India is not like the McDonald’s in the USA
And much more!
Follow Chad as he follows exactly what the Bible tells him (not the Holy Bible, the travelers Bible) and immerses himself in the local culture, meeting people from Australia, the USA and even one or two from India!

About Chad:
Chad Thomson is just a typical American leaving the comforts of his home country to explore the world. He was inspired to write about his adventures after reading the many, many travel blogs online. He writes travel stories and articles at http://www.backpackingwithchad.com

This is his story.*

*not the whole story, just the part that takes place in India. Stay tuned for further installments of The Adventures Of A Typical American!

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The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson


The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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The Ukimwi Road: From Kenya to Zimbabwe by Dervla Murphy

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In January 1992, Dervla Murphy prescribed herself several carefree months and embarked on a cycle tour (pedalling and pushing) from Kenya to Zimbabwe via Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia on the cyclist’s equivalent of a Rolls Royce called Lear. Before long, she realized that for travellers who wish to remain stress-free, Africa is the wrong continent. Inevitably she was caught up in the harrowing problems of the peoples she met; the devastating effects of AIDS (ukimwi is Swahili for AIDS), drought and economic collapse; scepticism about Western “aid schemes”; and corruption and incompetence, both white and black.

The Ukimwi Road: From Kenya to Zimbabwe

Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West by Paul Howard

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As bicycle races go, the attractions of the Tour Divide are not immediately apparent. For a start, it is the longest mountain-bike race in the world, running nearly 3,000 miles down the Rockies from Canada to Mexico. But the distance is not the only challenge – the total ascent of 200,000 ft is the equivalent of scaling Mount Everest nearly seven times.
Then there are the dangerous animals likely to be encountered on the route: grizzly bears, mountain lions and wolves, not to mention rattlesnakes and tarantulas. Worse, the rewards for all this effort are strictly limited. Unlike in the Tour de France, there is no fabled yellow jersey and no prize money.
Yet, undaunted, and in spite of never having owned a mountain bike, Paul Howard signed up. Battling the worst weather for generations, drinking whiskey with a cowboy and singing karaoke with the locals, Howard’s journey turned into more than just a race – it became the adventure of a lifetime.

Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West

The Places In Between by Rory Stewart

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Rory Stewart’s moving, sparsely poetic account of his walk across Afghanistan in January 2002 has been immediately hailed as a classic. Caught between hostile nations, warring factions and competing ideologies, at the time, Afghanistan was in turmoil following the US invasion. Travelling entirely on foot and following the inaccessible, mountainous route once taken by the Mohgul Emperor, Babur the Great, Stewart was nearly defeated by the extreme, hostile conditions. Only due to the help of an unexpected companion and the generosity of the people he met on the way, did he survive to report back with unique insight on a region closed to the world by twenty-four years of war.

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Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Cape Town by Paul Theroux

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Paul Theroux sets off for Cape Town from Cairo — the hard way.
Travelling across bush and desert, down rivers and across lakes, and through country after country, Theroux visits some of the most beautiful landscapes on earth, and some of the most dangerous. It is a journey of discovery and of rediscovery — of the unknown and the unexpected, but also of people and places he knew as a young and optimistic teacher forty years before.
Safari in Swahili simply means “journey”, and this is the ultimate safari. It is Theroux in his element — a trip where chance encounter is everything, where departure and arrival times are an irrelevance, and where contentment can be found balancing on the top of a truck in the middle of nowhere.

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Around the World on a Motorcycle: 1928 to 1936 by Zoltan Sulkowsky

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The year was 1928 when two young Hungarians decided to travel around the world on a motorcycle. Like Robert Fulton, whose circumnavigation of the globe is chronicled in his 1937 book “One Man Caravan”, Sulkowsky thought his was the first around-the-world journey on a motorcycle. Sulkowsky’s account of his travels, originally published in Hungary in 1937, has recently been translated into English and published with the original photographs. The trip, on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle with sidecar, started in Paris, France. During the next eight years Sulkowsky and his friend Gyula Bartha travelled through Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, Australia, south-east Asia, China, Japan, North and South America, and back to Europe. They earned enough money to keep travelling by selling photographs and accounts of their experiences and giving lectures in the many cities they visited along the way.Sulkowsky gives a very clear-eyed view of the world in the 1930s – a world where the colonising influence of Europe had affected much of Africa and Asia. He describes in detail the overwhelming effect the British had on Indian culture and contrasts that with countries farther east where the trappings of European dominance barely reached beyond the major cities. Sulkowsky and Bartha experienced the riches of sultans, witnessed primitive cultures and extreme poverty in remote villages, travelled through wilderness with the ever-present danger of wild animals, and traversed roads of all descriptions. They dealt with mud, sand, extreme heat and cold, and rivers where the motorcycle had to be taken apart to cross in a small boat. This intelligent and engaging book offers a unique worldview between the World Wars, flavoured by a sampling of the great diversity of cultures and the wide variety of human life that exists on this planet.

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Crazy River by Richard Grant

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No-one travels like the renowned writer-adventurer Richard Grant and, really, no-one should. Having narrowly escaped death at the hands of Mexican drug barons in Bandit Roads, he now plunges with his trademark recklessness and curiosity into Africa. Setting out to make the first descent of a previously unexplored river in Tanzania, he gets waylaid by thieves, whores and a degenerate former golf pro in Zanzibar, then crosses the Indian Ocean in a cargo dhow before the real adventure begins on the Malagarasi river. Travelling by raft, dodging bullets, hippos, lions and crocodiles, hacking through swamps and succumbing to fevers, Grant’s gripping, illuminating and often hilarious book will thrill his devoted readers and bring him to an even broader audience.

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