The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

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When young American Chad Thomson sets out on the adventure of a lifetime, little does he know how much of an impact the world will have on him. In this first installment of his travel memoirs, Chad begins his round-the-world travel adventure in typical American style. During his four weeks in India he discovers:
Nepal is not in India
The origin of the word tiffin (a mix of the words tin and muffin)
McDonald’s in India is not like the McDonald’s in the USA
And much more!
Follow Chad as he follows exactly what the Bible tells him (not the Holy Bible, the travelers Bible) and immerses himself in the local culture, meeting people from Australia, the USA and even one or two from India!

About Chad:
Chad Thomson is just a typical American leaving the comforts of his home country to explore the world. He was inspired to write about his adventures after reading the many, many travel blogs online. He writes travel stories and articles at http://www.backpackingwithchad.com

This is his story.*

*not the whole story, just the part that takes place in India. Stay tuned for further installments of The Adventures Of A Typical American!

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The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson


The Adventures Of A Typical American: India by Chad Thomson

Emergency Sex (And Other Desperate Measures): True Stories from a War Zone

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It’s the early 1990s and three young people are looking to change their lives, and perhaps also the world. Attracted to the ambitious global peacekeeping work of the UN, Andrew, Ken and Heidi’s paths cross in Cambodia, from where their fates are to become inextricably bound.Over the coming years, their stories interweave through countries such as Rwanda, Bosnia, Somalia and Haiti – war-torn, lawless places where the intervention of the UN is needed like nowhere else. Driven by idealism, the three struggle to do the best they can, caught up in an increasingly tangled web of bureaucracy and ineffectual leadership. As disillusionment sets in, they attempt to keep hold of their humanity through black humour, revelry and ’emergency sex’.
Brutal and moving in equal measure, Emergency Sex (And Other Desperate Measures) explores pressing global issues while never losing a sense of the personal. Deeply critical of the West’s indifference to developing countries and the UN’s repeated failure to intervene decisively, the book provoked massive controversy on its initial publication. Kofi Annan called for the book to be banned, and debate was sparked about the future direction of the UN. Brilliantly written and mordantly funny, it is a book that continues to make waves.

Emergency Sex (And Other Desperate Measures): True Stories from a War Zone

Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam with Ibn Battutah by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

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For Ibn Batuttah of Tangier, being medieval didn’t mean sitting at home waiting for renaissances, enlightenments and easyJet. It meant travelling the known world to its limits.
Seven centuries on, Tim Mackintosh-Smith’s passionate pursuit of the fourteenth-century traveller takes him to landfalls in remote tropical islands, torrid Indian Ocean ports and dusty towns on the shores of the Saharan sand-sea. His zigzag itinerary across time and space leads from Zanzibar to the Alhambra (via the Maldives, Sri Lanka, China, Mauritania and Guinea) and to a climactic conclusion to his quest for the man he calls ‘IB’ – a man who out-travelled Marco Polo by a factor of three, who spent his days with saints and sultans and his nights with an intercontinental string of slave-concubines.
Tim’s journey is a search for survivals from IB’s world – material, human, spiritual, edible – however, when your fellow traveller has a 700-year head start, familiar notions don’t always work.

Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam with Ibn Battutah

Tropic of Capricorn by Simon Reeve

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In Tropic of Capricorn, bestselling author Simon Reeve embarks on a 23,000-mile trek around the southernmost border of the tropics – a place of both amazing beauty and overwhelming human suffering. Heading east through Africa, Australia and South America, Simon encounters breathtaking landscapes and truly extraordinary people: from Bushmen of the Kalahari and Namibian prostitutes battling with HIV to gem miners in Madagascar and teenagers in the Brazilian favela once described as the most dangerous place on earth. It is a collection of daring adventures, strange rituals and exotic wildlife, all linked together by one invisible line.
Like the best travel writing, Tropic of Capricorn confronts important issues of our time – our changing environment, poverty, globalisation – by taking us on an unforgettable journey of discovery.

Tropic of Capricorn

[Article] The Lonely Planet Guide To My Apartment

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A funny parody of the Lonely Planet guides:

Lonely Planet Guide To My Apartment

An Idiot Abroad: The Travel Diaries of Karl Pilkington by Karl Pilkington, Ricky Gervais & Stephen Merchant

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Presenting the Travel Diaries of Karl Pilkington: Adventurer. Philosopher. Idiot. Karl Pilkington isn’t keen on travelling. Given the choice, he’ll go on holiday to Devon or Wales or, at a push, eat English food on a package holiday in Majorca. Which isn’t exactly Michael Palin, is it? So what happened when he was convinced by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant to go on an epic adventure to see the Seven Wonders of the World? Travel broadens the mind, right? You’d think so…Find out in Karl Pilkington’s hilarious travel diaries. ‘He is a moron. A completely round, empty-headed, part-chimp Manc.’ RICKY GERVAIS ‘He’d have been happier in medieval times in a village where you didn’t travel beyond the local community.’ STEPHEN MERCHANT

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Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Cape Town by Paul Theroux

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Paul Theroux sets off for Cape Town from Cairo — the hard way.
Travelling across bush and desert, down rivers and across lakes, and through country after country, Theroux visits some of the most beautiful landscapes on earth, and some of the most dangerous. It is a journey of discovery and of rediscovery — of the unknown and the unexpected, but also of people and places he knew as a young and optimistic teacher forty years before.
Safari in Swahili simply means “journey”, and this is the ultimate safari. It is Theroux in his element — a trip where chance encounter is everything, where departure and arrival times are an irrelevance, and where contentment can be found balancing on the top of a truck in the middle of nowhere.

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Around the World on a Motorcycle: 1928 to 1936 by Zoltan Sulkowsky

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The year was 1928 when two young Hungarians decided to travel around the world on a motorcycle. Like Robert Fulton, whose circumnavigation of the globe is chronicled in his 1937 book “One Man Caravan”, Sulkowsky thought his was the first around-the-world journey on a motorcycle. Sulkowsky’s account of his travels, originally published in Hungary in 1937, has recently been translated into English and published with the original photographs. The trip, on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle with sidecar, started in Paris, France. During the next eight years Sulkowsky and his friend Gyula Bartha travelled through Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, Australia, south-east Asia, China, Japan, North and South America, and back to Europe. They earned enough money to keep travelling by selling photographs and accounts of their experiences and giving lectures in the many cities they visited along the way.Sulkowsky gives a very clear-eyed view of the world in the 1930s – a world where the colonising influence of Europe had affected much of Africa and Asia. He describes in detail the overwhelming effect the British had on Indian culture and contrasts that with countries farther east where the trappings of European dominance barely reached beyond the major cities. Sulkowsky and Bartha experienced the riches of sultans, witnessed primitive cultures and extreme poverty in remote villages, travelled through wilderness with the ever-present danger of wild animals, and traversed roads of all descriptions. They dealt with mud, sand, extreme heat and cold, and rivers where the motorcycle had to be taken apart to cross in a small boat. This intelligent and engaging book offers a unique worldview between the World Wars, flavoured by a sampling of the great diversity of cultures and the wide variety of human life that exists on this planet.

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Crossing the Heart of Africa: An Odyssey of Love and Adventure by Julian Smith

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“The amazing true story of Julian Smith, who retraced the journey of legendary British explorer Ewart The Leopard Grogan, the first man to cross the length of Africa, in hopes of also winning the heart of the woman he loved. In 1898, the dashing young British explorer Ewart the Leopard Grogan was in love. In order to prove his mettle to his beloved – and her aristocratic stepfather – he set out on a quest to become the first person to walk across Africa, a feat hitherto thought by many explorers to be impossible”. (“New York Times”, 1900). In 2007, thirty-five-year-old American journalist Julian Smith faced a similar problem with his girlfriend of six years …and decided to address it in the same way Grogan had more than a hundred years before: he was going to retrace the Leopard’s 4,500-mile journey for love and glory through the lakes, volcanoes, savannas, and crowded modern cities of Africa. Smith interweaves both adventures into a seamless narrative in “Crossing the Heart of Africa”: the story of two explorers, a century apart, who both traversed the length of Africa to prove themselves …and came back changed men.

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The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner

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What makes a nation happy? Is one country’s sense of happiness the same as another’s? In the last two decades, psychologists and economists have learned a lot about who’s happy and who isn’t. The Dutch are, the Romanians aren’t, and Americans are somewhere in between…
After years of going to the world’s least happy countries, Eric Weiner, a veteran foreign correspondent, decided to travel and evaluate each country’s different sense of happiness and discover the nation that seemed happiest of all.
·He discovers the relationship between money and happiness in tiny and extremely wealthy Qatar (and it’s not a good one)
·He goes to Thailand, and finds that not thinking is a contented way of life.
·He goes to the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan, and discovers they have an official policy of Gross National Happiness!
·He asks himself why the British don’t do happiness?
In Weiner’s quest to find the world’s happiest places, he eats rotten Icelandic shark, meditates in Bangalore, visits strip clubs in Bangkok and drinks himself into a stupor in Reykjavik. Full of inspired moments, The Geography of Bliss accomplishes a feat few travel books dare and even fewer achieve: to make you happier.

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