Balkan Ghosts by Robert Kaplan

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From the assassination that set off World War I to the ethnic warfare sweeping Bosnia and Croatia, the Balkans have been the crucible of the 20th century–the place where terrorism and genocide were first practiced as tools of policy. This enthralling political travelogue helps us understand that region’s anguish.

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Black Lamb And Grey Falcon: A Journey Through Yugoslavia by Rebecca West

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First published in 1942, Rebecca West’s epic masterpiece is widely regarded as the most illuminating book to have been written on the former state of Yugoslavia. It is a work of enduring value that remains essential for anyone attempting to understand the enigmatic history of the Balkan states, and the continuing friction in this fractured area of Europe. This title is a new edition of a travel literature classic introduced by Geoff Dyer.

The Key To My Neighbours House by Elizabeth Neuffer

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From her unique vantage point as a reporter directly covering the reality and aftermath of genocide in Bosnia and Rwanda, award-winning journalist Elizabeth Neuffer tells the compelling story of two parallel journeys toward justice in each country – that of the international war crime tribunals, and that of the people left behind. In a book packed with devastating stories, including those of victims and perpetrators, forensic experts and tribunal judges, two provide the double backbone of the book’s narrative: Hasan Nuhanovic, a Bosnian muslim whose determination to discover the fate of his family lost at Srebrenica sees him mature over the years from a gangling youth to a man with the authority to testify before Congress; and Witness JJ, a Tutsi woman of staggering courage who overcomes her modesty and the dictates of her culture to testify about the rapes that are classified as war crimes.

The Fall Of Yugoslavia by Misha Glenny

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Misha Glenny’s acclaimed account of the war in former Yugoslavia contains substantial new material that discusses the end of the five-year conflict and looks ahead to an uneasy future in this turbulent region.
Writing in the Evening Standard, Fitzroy Maclean said ‘Misha Glenny’s deeply disturbing book is, to my mind, essential reading for anyone trying to understand, or even just follow, events in what was once Yugoslavia’.
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The Zanzibar Chest: A Memoir Of Love And War by Aidan Hartley

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A deeply affecting memoir of a childhood in Africa and the continent’s horrendous wars, which Hartley witnessed at first hand as a journalist in the 1990s. Shortlisted for the prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-fiction, this is a masterpiece of autobiographical journalism.
Aidan Hartley, a foreign correspondent, burned-out from the horror of covering the terrifying micro wars of the 1990s, from Rwanda to Bosnia, seeks solace and solitude in the remote mountains and deserts of southern Arabia and the Yemen, following his father’s death. While there, he finds himself on the trail of the tragic story of an old friend of his father’s, who fell in love and was murdered in southern Arabia fifty years ago. As the terrible events of the past unfold, Hartley finds his own kind of deliverance.
‘The Zanzibar Chest’ is a powerful story about a man witnessing and confronting extreme violence and being broken down by it, and of a son trying to come to terms with the death of a father whom he also saw as his best friend. It charts not only a love affair between two people, but also the British love affair with Arabia and the vast emptinesses of the desert, which become a fitting metaphor for the emotional and spiritual condition in which Hartley finds himself.
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